property


property
That which is peculiar or proper to any person; that which belongs exclusively to one. In the strict legal sense, an aggregate of rights which are guaranteed and protected by the government. Fulton Light, Heat & Power Co. v. State, 65 Misc.Rep. 263, 121 N.Y.S. 536.
The term is said to extend to every species of valuable right and interest. More specifically, ownership; the unrestricted and exclusive right to a thing; the right to dispose of a thing in every legal way, to possess it, to use it, and to exclude every one else from interfering with it. That dominion or indefinite right of use or disposition which one may lawfully exercise over particular things or subjects. The exclusive right of possessing, enjoying, and disposing of a thing. The highest right a man can have to anything; being used to refer to that right which one has to lands or tenements, goods or chattels, which no way depends on another man's courtesy. The word is also commonly used to denote everything which is the subject of ownership, corporeal or incorporeal, tangible or intangible, visible or invisible, real or personal; everything that has an exchangeable value or which goes to make up wealth or estate. It extends to every species of valuable right and interest, and includes real and personal property, easements, franchises, and incorporeal hereditaments, and includes every invasion of one's property rights by actionable wrong. Labberton v. General Cas. Co. of America, 53 Wash.2d 180, 332 P.2d 250, 252, 254.
Property embraces everything which is or may be the subject of ownership, whether a legal ownership, or whether beneficial, or a private ownership. Davis v. Davis, Tex.Civ.App., 495 S.W.2d 607, 611.
Term includes not only ownership and possession but also the right of use and enjoyment for lawful purposes. Hoffmann v. Kinealy, Mo., 389 S.W.2d 745, 752.
Property, within constitutional protection, denotes group of rights inhering in citizen's relation to physical thing, as right to possess, use and dispose of it. Cereghino v. State By and Through State Highway Commission, 230 Or. 439, 370 P.2d 694, 697.
Goodwill is property, Howell v. Bowden, Tex.Civ.App., 368 S.W.2d 842, 848;
as is an insurance policy and rights incident thereto, including a right to the proceeds, Harris v. Harris, 83 N.M. 441, 493 P.2d 407, 408.
Criminal law.
"Property" means anything of value, including real estate, tangible and intangible personal property, contract rights, choses-in-action and other interests in or claims to wealth, admission or transportation tickets, captured or domestic animals, food and drink, electric or other power. Model Penal Code, No. 223.0.
See also chattel
- marital property.
Classification
Property is either:
real or immovable; or, personal or movable. Calif.Civil Code, No. 657.
- property tax
- separate property.
- tangible property
- property tax

Black's law dictionary. . 1990.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Property — is any physical or virtual entity that is owned by an individual. An owner of property has the right to consume, sell, mortgage, transfer and exchange his or her property.cite web|url=http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/property.html|titl… …   Wikipedia

  • property — prop·er·ty n pl ties [Anglo French propreté proprieté, from Latin proprietat proprietas, from proprius own, particular] 1: something (as an interest, money, or land) that is owned or possessed see also asset, estate, interest …   Law dictionary

  • Property — • The person who enjoys the full right to dispose of it insofar as is not forbidden by law Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Property     Property      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • property — prop‧er‧ty [ˈprɒpəti ǁ ˈprɑːpər ] noun properties PLURALFORM 1. [uncountable] LAW all the things that someone owns: • Some of the stolen property was found in Mason s house. • The President supports a tax cut on profits from sales of property… …   Financial and business terms

  • property — and property rights are central to capitalist societies. Perhaps because they are largely taken for granted in this context they have received relatively little attention from sociologists. By comparison, political philosophers and economists… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Property — Prop er*ty, n.; pl. {Properties}. [OE. proprete, OF. propret[ e] property, F. propret[ e] neatness, cleanliness, propri[ e]t[ e] property, fr. L. proprietas. See {Proper}, a., and cf. {Propriety}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which is proper to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • property — c.1300, nature, quality, later possession (a sense rare before 17c.), from an Anglo Fr. modification of O.Fr. propriete (12c., Fr. propreté), from L. proprietatem (nom. proprietas) ownership, property, propriety, lit. special character (a loan… …   Etymology dictionary

  • property — Includes money, goods, things in action, land and every description of property, whether real or personal, legal or equitable, and whether situated in Canada or elsewhere, and includes obligations, easements and every description of estate,… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • property — [präp′ər tē] n. pl. properties [ME proprete < OFr proprieté < L proprietas < proprius, one s own] 1. a) the right to possess, use, and dispose of something; ownership [property in land] b) something, as a piece of writing, in which… …   English World dictionary

  • Property — Prop er*ty, v. t. [1913 Webster] 1. To invest which properties, or qualities. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To make a property of; to appropriate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] They have here propertied me. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • property — [n1] possessions, real estate acreage, acres, assets, belongings, buildings, capital, chattels, claim, dominion, effects, equity, estate, farm, freehold, goods, holdings, home, house, inheritance, land, means, ownership, plot, possessorship,… …   New thesaurus